A Compassionate Thanksgiving: How I Ate Vegan On a Meat-Heavy Holiday

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The Thanksgiving tradition in my family is to have ham. I don’t know how this came about, but it’s what has been done. The tradition of eating turkey, or some other kind of meat is very commonplace for Thanksgiving, unfortunately. This year is the first that I’ve lived with my vegan partner and not my omnivore family. We decided to have our own meal that would reflect our values and also be super delicious! There are many options when cooking and baking vegan, but I wanted to share with you what we chose.Zengarry's Holiday Brie

We started out the day by having brunch with my family. My mom was very thoughtful and provided Yves breakfast sausages, fresh bread, and sliced melons for us, along with coffee with almond milk and a few other things. We also brought along Auntie Loo’s pumpkin spice scones and cinnamon buns. We shared some Zengarry Holiday Brie as well – a big hit with my sisters. I found that spending time with my family over brunch rather than over a turkey dinner was easier for me. Less cooking birds, and more talking and catching up! Our little rescue dog, Démo the Pekingese, also came with us. We enjoyed a walk at the dog park near my parents’s place after eating way too much.Pumpkin Pecan Pie

When we got home, I started on a pumpkin-pecan pie. The recipe was graciously provided to me by someone on the NCVA Facebook page. I love getting recipes that are tried and true already! We went with a pre-made crust and it turned out amazing. This was my first attempt at any sort of pecan pie, vegan or otherwise, so I’m excited to make some modifications to the flavour and try it again.   Once the pie was out of the oven, I threw in a Celebration Roast from Field Roast. Field Roast products may not be widely available in Canada soon, so we figured we’d better make the most of it now. We actually have another one in our freezer for Christmas! Gotta plan ahead for family holidays.

 Anyways, while the Field Roast did it’s thing in the oven, I started boiling potatoes to be mashed into Isa Chandra’s “Fluffy Mashed Potatoes” recipe from the Post Punk Kitchen. I can vouch for the fact that they are fluffy. Very delicious and simple recipe, and we skipped the gravy. I’m a mushroom-hater at heart.

The full meal!Meanwhile, my partner sliced up kale and prepared a dressing for Oh She Glow’s “The Best Shredded Kale Salad”. We made a few mods. We skipped the pecan parmesan and added almonds to the cranberry garnish. It was a light and tart dressing that went well with the cranberries, and was also a good way to get some raw greens into our very rich dinner. I would make this again, but I’d love to try the pecan parmesan next time too! I have some nutritional yeast from VegFest Montreal that I’m itching to use.

Lastly were the Brussel sprouts. These I pulled from Isa Chandra’s “Isa Does It” cookbook. They’re in a recipe for a sweet potato gnocchi dinner, but I just made the tarragon cashew cream and seared Brussel sprouts. This was a more complicated part of our meal, as I find the recipes from this book tend to be. The pay off is huge, though. I’m so glad that I was leant this cookbook! It’s taught me a lot about vegan food prep that I didn’t know, and has certainly provided me with some impressive recipes to add to my repertoire.

Everything worked out well, which we were thankful for. I tried a few new recipes for our Thanksgiving meal and new recipes don’t always look presentable the first time. I hope that you and yours had a restful holiday, and I’d love to hear what you made for your “alternative” Thanksgiving feasts!

The great Mindful Mavens ZenKitchen giveaway

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ZenKitchen co-founder David Loan.

ZenKitchen co-founder David Loan.

The Giveaway has now closed. Thank you to all who entered. A winner will be announced soon!

Back in 2008, I started hearing rumours about this monthly vegan dinner club in Ottawa, called ZenKitchen.  I was intrigued, but too afraid of an abundance of mushrooms on the fixed menu to attend one.  Then, I learned that the fine folks behind the initiative were planning to open a gourmet vegan restaurant, and it was as though all of my dreams had come true. Since ZenKitchen opened in Ottawa in 2009, vegans and non-vegans alike have been spoiled rotten by its existence.  Finally, we had a place we could take our non-vegan friends and family for special occasions.  Finally, a place from which we could order freely from the entire menu, without concern for hidden dairy or eggs. A fancy pants place where we didn’t have to grill the servers over every ingredient, or ask the chef to make something vegan, and then wait in trepidation for the result. This past May, unexpectedly, ZenKitchen shut its doors, and I was devastated. You know how sometimes you don’t fully appreciate what you have until it’s gone? My husband and I had recently attended its sugar shack brunch, and were reminded of how much we love it.  I felt a sense of loss at the prospect of never sitting in its comfortable dining area, eating poutine and sundaes and apple glazed tofu skewers ever again (#firstworldproblems). I also felt terrible for its owner – my friend – David Loan, who had poured his heart and soul into it for years.

Zen Tapas, including the tofu skewers that dreams are made of.

Zen Tapas, including the tofu skewers that dreams are made of.

ZenKitchen managed to reopen a couple of months later, under new ownership, but is still under the direction of Captain Loan.  Unfortunately, while a lot of people heard that it had closed, not nearly as many have heard about its reopening.  So we want to change that so that we can enjoy ZenKitchen for many years to come. And starting this Thursday, ZenKitchen will be offering a full lunch and brunch menu!  The menus are moderately priced, and have a mix of old favourites and new creations.  You should definitely check it out! (Links are below.) Here’s what’s up for grabs. Two lucky winners will each win a $50 gift certificate for ZenKitchen.  That means you can encourage your friends to enter, without eliminating your own chances!  Here’s what you need to do to enter the contest: – Take a look at ZenKitchen’s dinner menu, lunch menu or brunch menu; – If you’ve already been to ZenKitchen, share your favourite menu item, along with what you love most about ZenKitchen; – If you’ve never been to ZenKitchen, share what menu item most entices you. Winners will be chosen randomly by number draw. Details: Giveaway is open to National Capital Region residents, excluding Quebec.  Two random winners will win a $50 gift certificate to ZenKitchen, to be mailed to the winner directly from ZenKitchen.  Giveaway closes on Wednesday, Oct. 15 at 11:59 PM EST.  One entry per person. The Mindful Mavens are not responsible for the delivery of the prize and cannot be held accountable for any discrepancies. Disclosure: The author received promotional consideration or payment such as samples, related to a product mentioned in this post. 

Montreal Vegan Festival Round-Up!

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Hello readers!

This past weekend I had the pleasure of attending the first ever Montreal Vegan Festival! In addition to brushing up on my French, I basked in a crowd of ethical people, and ate my weight in vegan food. In this post I’m going to be highlighting my favourite parts, but you can find a complete list of exhibitors on the Festival’s website, here.

Free vegan cookies!

Free vegan cookies!

My friend and I took the train from Ottawa at arrived at noon in Montreal. The festival was only a twenty minute walk from the train station, located at the Coeur de science, a UQAM building on Sherbrooke. This gave us a chance to stretch our legs and see the city. We approached the entrance table and were given a Sophie Sucrée molasses cookie just for showing up! A two dollar donation towards the costs of running the festival also got us a reusable Natura bag. Admission was free. We were already some happy vegans.

We then headed off to the exhibitors section. Full disclosure: I attended none of the talks given. The complete list of what talks were given is on the website.

FEDJA's table display!

FEDJA’s table display!

First impressions: it was packed! The first room seemed to be mainly animal advocacy groups. The first table we approached was FEDJA (Fonds étudiant pour la défense juridique des animaux). The students manning the table had very informative pamphlets that approached animal activism from a legal standpoint. They had painstakingly flagged pages of the Criminal Code that applied to animals, and were both very knowledgeable and passionate. We also checked out the APFA (The Association for the Protection of Fur-Bearing Animals), where we found some cute buttons and stickers available by donation. To access the next room, we walked across a small courtyard.

This is where we started to get into the food items. This room was even busier! I think it’s safe to say the festival had a good turnout. Right by the entrance was the Sophie Sucrée table, where I couldn’t resist purchasing their banana chocolate chip loaf. I shared it with my partner the next day it was still moist as ever! Next, we sidled over to the Giddy Yo-Yo display. Any other chocoholics out there will understand why this was exciting to me! I ended up only getting some of their chocolate-scented lotion, as their products (all raw and vegan!) are widely available in Ottawa as well.

Lola Rosa's lunch offering.

Lola Rosa’s lunch offering.

At this point we were starting to want lunch. It was around 1:00pm, and we had spent the morning traveling. The first both we saw was the tried and true Lola Rosa. There, we had a taco bowl with beans and other vegetables on it. This ended up being messy, but so worth it. We purchased what look and tasted like cookie dough bars from them as well. We ended up getting one of the last taco bowls, they had to send someone back to the restaurant to get more! We checked out Chef Veganessa next. Chef Veganessa provides meal delivery and cooking classes, located in Beaconsfield, Quebec. The business is run by owner Vanessa Percher, a certified nutritionist and natural food advocate. Luckily for us, they had their food available for us to try. I purchased Power Balls, a delicious chocolatey date and nut ball, as well as a rice wrap with cashew. My friend and I ate our rice wraps on the train and found them to be filling and miraculously not soggy, despite our long day.

Mouton Vert's Mouthwatering Products

Mouton Vert’s Mouthwatering Products

One business that stood out to me was Mouton Vert. They’re a bakery and restaurant located in Montreal that offers Mediterranean vegetarian and vegan food. I had never heard of them previously, but they had a variety of Greek food, veganized! I was offered a ginger cookie that was crispy and spicy. Of course, I purchased other Greek treats and was told that the owners’ mother actually made a lot of the treats herself. How cute is that? I can’t wait to try them out next time I’m in town.

Now on to a few other tables we visited briefly. Macatruffe, where I purchased decadent mint rose truffles, and Druide Cosmetiques, where I found vegan cinnamon toothpaste. I have a lot of trouble finding vegan toothpaste that I find actually works, so I’ve been encouraged by the Druide brand so far. I quite like it! I’m upset I only purchased the smaller tube. I was glad to be able to find some new vegan brands to try outside of the Ottawa Scene.

Pamela Tourigny of the NCVA and Ottawa Veg Fest, and Nadia Mohabir, who played a big role in organizing the Montreal Vegan Festival. Feat. Paradis Végeetarien's kebab.

Pamela Tourigny of the NCVA and Ottawa Veg Fest, and Nadia Mohabir, who played a big role in organizing the Montreal Vegan Festival. Feat. Paradis Végeetarien’s kebab.

And finally, we reached the last room. We were greeted by the famous Paradis Végétarien’s booth, with some bizarrely meaty mock-meat products. I tried the kebab and was a little weirded out by how meaty it was. Take that as you will, but I think I’ll be sticking to other brands for now. Moving down the aisle, I found Auntie Loo and Zengarry of Ottawa fame! Both were doing incredibly well, with exclamations of “yum!” being heard from the crowd. Auntie Loo’s was offering samples of their coffee cake that people seemed to love. I shared the pumpkin cake with my friend on the train home, even in Montreal we had to get our Auntie Loo’s fix!

Librairie Zone Libre's spread

Librairie Zone Libre’s spread

The last booth I’d like to mention is Librairie Zone Libre. They carried a lot of titles surrounding animal rights and ethics. Although they mainly had French titles, I purchased a copy of Ecofeminism (edited by Carol J. Adams!) in English. It’s great to have a booth like theirs to round out all the food and cosmetic booths. I can’t wait to dig in to my new book while munching on Sophie Sucree banana bread.

We spent about 3 hours there total. By the end, we exited and sat in a courtyard and had a drink, it got really hot in there! I’m so pleased with how the festival turned out, it was very well organized. I am eagerly anticipating next year’s festival already.

A peek behind scenes: The Montreal Vegan Festival, Saturday Sept. 26-27

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I have been super excited about this upcoming weekend for many months now. After nearly a year of planning, the Montreal Vegan Festival will be happening in downtown Montreal.

One of my best friends in the whole wide world, Nadia Mohabir, has played a big role in organizing it, and the really cool thing is that she was also there – back in 2009 – when we launched the very first Ottawa Veg Fest (which I co-founded).  We put on five highly successful Ottawa Veg Fests before skipping this year (totalling more than 15,000 visitors), so it’s perfect timing for Montreal’s big event.  We’ve always had a contingent of Montrealers come to Ottawa for ours, and I’m thrilled now to be attending theirs. (If you’d like to become involved with organizing Ottawa Veg Fest 2015, see here for more information.)

Montreal is only a couple of hours away, so there’s still time to make plans to go. Taking the bus is dirt cheap, the event is free, and the part with exhibitors and demos is happening this Saturday, Sept. 27 (a talk by Ottawa Veg Fest alumnus Dr. Michael Greger kicks things off on Friday, Sept. 26). I hope to see some of you there!  I’ve got some serious eating planned, and I can’t wait to celebrate with the Montreal team!

I asked Nadia – who has been vegan for nine years – to answer a few questions about the Montreal Vegan Festival.

PT:  How did the festival come about?

NM: The Montreal Vegetarian Association was founded in 2005. While membership gradually increased throughout the first few years after its inception, the last couple of years have brought about an exponential increase in membership and general public interest. The growing demand for a Festival resulted in the creation of an Organizing Committee for the first Montreal Vegan Festival. In October 2013, 15 core volunteers came together to initiate the project. The event will focus on the health, environmental and ethical reasons surrounding veganism via a series of conferences and panels, cooking demonstrations, exhibitor booths and community organizations.

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Nadia at the very first Ottawa Veg Fest in 2009.

PT: Tell us about your involvement with it.

NM: As a member of and volunteer for the National Capital Vegetarian Association in 2009, I was fortunate to participate in Ottawa’s first Veg Fest. Within a few years, momentum in the worldwide vegan movement brought about enough interest in Montreal to warrant a Festival, and this is when I became involved. As Director of the Montreal Vegan Festival, it is my pleasure to work with a talented group of volunteers who are dedicated to the cause, including:

  • Sameer Muldeen, President of the Montreal Vegetarian Association (MVA), former Director of Operations for a renowned vegan restaurant;
  • Anne-Marie Roy, Vice-President of the MVA, co-founder of the MVA, dietitian-nutritionist and founder of the 20 year-old vegan clinic La Clinique Renversante;
  • Alexandre Gagnon, Webmaster for the MVA, co-founder of the MVA; and
  • Elise Desaulniers, author of Je mange avec ma tête (2013) and Vache à lait (2011), speaker on food and ethics.

PT: What has inspired your participation? Why do you think this event is important?

NM: My own transition to vegetarianism (2002) and then veganism (2005) required a host of resources and information in three different cities: Montreal, Ottawa and Toronto. As an individual, I found the challenges to being veg*n were education and accessibility.

When I joined the Vegetarian Associations in Ottawa and Montreal, I found the support that I needed and met many new friends and peers with the same values and interests as myself. The first Ottawa Veg Fest encouraged the normalization of veg*nism and discouraged the marginalization of individuals who choose to be veg*n for a panopoly of reasons. Inspired by my positive experience as a volunteer and participant in Ottawa, I hope to help bring these values to Montreal.

PT: What are some of the event highlights?

NM: I am personally very excited about so many elements of the Festival! Some of the incredible successes we have had began prior to the Festival, with the 21-Day Vegan Challenge (in French) which has been undertaken by nearly 2,000 individuals to date. We also held a sold-out screening of Cowspiracy (2014), followed by a Q&A period with the director Kip Andersen, as a fundraiser for the Festival. (Don’t worry if you missed it – a second screening will take place a the Festival! Admission is FREE!) So much more is yet to come!

The Festival opens on Sept. 26 with a talk by the American physician and nutrition expert Dr. Michael Greger. Every year, Dr. Greger, in collaboration with the Montreal Vegetarian Association, fills an auditorium of 700+ seats by presenting the year’s latest scientific research in nutrition in colloquial language. Empowering the general public with access to credible resources, Dr. Greger encourages everyone to make informed decisions about food choices. And his talks are always fun and engaging!
nm2On Sept. 27, Adrian Copeland of Sel Noir will be presenting Molecular Cooking on the Chef’s stage. Veganism and modern food techniques unite for those who are looking for a more advanced repertoire in the kitchen. All food demonstrations will be followed by tastings so come with an empty tummy!

Follow your tastebuds with what else but… more food! A quick snack from Vega, or a more elaborate experience at the exhibitor booths of some of the best restaurants in town will provide enough energy for you to enjoy the rest of the day. Invitation V and Sophie Sucrée will both be present so you can get your savoury and sweet fix!

Finally, for those who are more interested in the ethical implications of food choices, several panels and talks will take place throughout the 27th, including panels addressing animal advocacy and animal rights. More information on scheduling is provided at festivalveganedemontreal.com.

PT: What have you learned so far through your involvement with organizing the festival?

NM: I’ve learned that there are lot of people who care a lot about veganism in Montreal and elsewhere in the world, and that the strength of the community is greater than the strength of one. The volunteers in our organization have devoted more than a thousand hours to make this event happen. The work of these volunteers is a mark of dedication to the cause: they answer emails at midnight, take phone calls during their day jobs, and make many sacrifices because they are driven by a deep-rooted desire to help newcomers in the vegan community.

The gradual shift towards veg*nism is palpable in Montreal and elsewhere, and we continually receive messages from the public about their excitement for the Festival. This excitement and encouragement from vegans, vegetarians, foodies, environmentalists, the veg-friendly and the veg-curious alike keeps us forging ahead!

PT: Anything else?

NM: Admission to all Festival activities on the 27th, from 10am to 6pm is free for all. Join our Facebook page to keep up to date . Challenge yourself and get the chance to win some great prizes by joining our 21-Day Vegan Challenge.  Support the mission of the Montreal Vegan Festival by inviting your friends and family to attend the Festival with you.

PT: I am so proud of you NM! xo

A star is born: Meet Erika of Erika’s Vegan Catering

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ericaOttawa vegans are a-buzz about Erika’s Vegan Catering; now, we too have a rising star.

Erika’s Vegan Catering is the project of 16-year-old Erika LeBlanc, who is as straightforward and sensible as her aptly named business.   A vegan of five years, and life-long vegetarian, Erika is no stranger to the vegan world and has already had years to perfect her craft.  She launched her catering business several months ago, focusing on comfort foods and convenience – she even delivers! A portion of all sales support Westminster Pet Sanctuary, a registered charity that her family has run for nearly two decades.

Online reviews from patrons have been overwhelmingly positive.  “I have found the best caterer ever! Erika’s and family from Erika’s Vegan Catering are the absolute best at customer service and most importantly she is the greatest chef ever. I have eaten all over the world at some of the best restaurants and I have never left so satisfied and happy as I did after experiencing this,” wrote one on the NCVA Facebook group.

We decided to learn a bit more about Erika.

PT: What is the concept behind Erika’s VeganCatering?

EL: I created my business mostly to educate people on veganism and to also to recreate classic meat dishes and make them vegan.

PT:  How did your business come into being?

EL: Family and friends gave me the idea to start my own business, so I did.

PT: What are some of the biggest milestones you’ve experienced with your business?

EL: I would have to say my biggest milestone is converting meat eaters to vegetarian/vegan, just by educating and letting them try my food.

PT:  Is cooking something in which you have had a longstanding interest?

EL: Yes, I’ve been cooking since I was very young and I’ve always wanted to be in the food business. It’s my passion.

erica food1PT: What are some of your most popular products?

EL: My most popular products would have to be the my lavender cupcakes and “egg” salad.

PT: How can people buy them from you?

People can simply go on my Facebook page (Erika’s Vegan Catering) and send me a message, or send me an email at Erikasvegancatering@mail.com and place their orders there, and I will be happy to deliver the food right to their door.

erica food2PT: Anything else people should know?

Although I’m only 16, I have a lot of dreams like attending a vegan culinary school in the United states in the year 2015. But for now, I’m working on my catering buisness and saving all the profits toward my tuition for culinary school.

Erika has some really exciting projects coming up, but can’t share the details yet.  Stay tuned for more on this ambitious – and compassionate – young lady!

Lather up! Sud With Me initiative helps dogs in need

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aniaI want to tell you all about Ania Kemp, who has recently become a soap making maven, all in the name of raising funds for Sit With Me dog rescue.

Ania is vegan (as are her products), and now sells her soapy creations exclusively to raise funds for the rescue.  They are made of pure, safe ingredients, and sometimes even decorated with images of adorable adoptable dogs.

The next place where she will be selling her products is  at the “BBQ for rescue” at the Bells Corners Animal Hospital, 2194 Robertson Rd., from 11-3 on Sunday Sept. 14.

I asked Ania some questions so we could learn more about her initiative, Sud With Me.

PT: What exactly is Sud With Me? What is the concept?

AK:  Sud With Me is my little fundraising business where I sell natural products and donate profits to rescue. I sell natural soap, deodorant, bug spray, chap stick, and solid perfume. I plan to make other products in the future, such as paw chap for dogs to help with cracked paws in the winter.

sudwithme1PT: How did Sud With Me come to be?

AK: I’m on the fundraising committee for Sit With Me Shelter Dog Rescue (SWM) and I’ve been trying to think of things that I can do to help raise funds for rescue dogs. I tried making other items without success, but when a friend showed me how to make soap and other natural products, I thought I could try to sell them and donate profits to a rescue. I enjoy making the products, so it’s a hobby with a purpose.

PT: What are you hoping to accomplish with Sud With Me?

AK: I’d like to sell as many products as I can make so that I can donate as much money to rescue as possible.

PT: Is soap making etc. something in which you have had a longstanding interest?

AK: Nope! I’ve been interested in natural products for a while, but I really only became interested in making them when a friend and I got together and started talking about it. She has a small business where she sells her amazing products and she offered to show me how to make them. Mary, the founder of Filthy Pig Soap Co., also loves to help animals and donates her products to different SWM events. She was more than happy to show me how to make and label everything. I’m still really new to this so I hope my products start to look better with time – but they work great!

sudwithme2PT:  What are some of the most popular products?

AK: The soap is the most popular product to date, but I’ve only started to sell the other products recently. The solid deodorant has been going fast as well.

PT:  How can people buy them from you?

AK: People can order my products from me from my Facebook page, but they’ll need to come by my place to pick up. Otherwise, I try to go to as many SWM events as possible and I sell my products there. I post which events I will be going to on my Facebook page as well.

PT:  Anything else people should know?

AK: Many products are tested on animals, which is cruel and unnecessary. With all the harmful chemicals being put into personal and household products, I think it’s important to think natural.  Most household items that we buy can be made at home using natural ingredients. I encourage people to give it a try – it’s fun and rewarding! If you don’t have the time to make your own products, look for the leaping bunny when buying any store-bought product, read the ingredients and learn what you are putting in and on your body, as well as in your home.

A gallery of Sud With Me products – including prices – can be found here.

Easy, tasty and healthy: Chickpea Croquettes

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The busier I get with work, sports, volunteering and other interests, the less time I have to cook.  I mean, I could cook everything from scratch, but then I wouldn’t have any down time at all.  I also don’t earn enough to eat out many meals (who does?), so I’ve been trying to find the best corners that I can cut, in order to maximize the nutrition but minimize the time I have to spend preparing food.

chickpea croquettes afterIt was with that on my mind that I came across a recipe online for Chickpea Croquettes.  I wanted to eat less faux meats, but still have something substantial and satiating to accompany my simple vegetable sides (i.e. roasted brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, broccoli, kale, etc.)  I had tried making homemade veggie burgers in the past, but they tended to fall apart so I didn’t have high hopes.

These are now a go-to.  One batch is enough for 12 or so croquettes (I typically eat two in one sitting) and they’re full of vegetables and protein.  The ingredients and process of making them are both simple. The batter keeps well in the fridge for up to a week, and they’re best made freshly pan fried. Best of all, they hold together really well.  They’re simple, tasty and healthy.  They are also celiac-friendly.

Chickpea Croquettes

Adapted from a non-vegan recipe at Tasty-yummies

Cilantro Coconut Sauce

  • 1 TB chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 TB lemon juice
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
  • Half a cup full fat coconut milk
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Combine all ingredients in a measuring cup and whisk well. Does not keep the greatest; eat within a couple of days or make a fresh batch when you make more croquettes.

Chickpea Croquettes

  • 1 cup chickpea flour
  • 3/4 cup hot water
  • 2 TB lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 19-oz can chickpeas, rinsed and drained well
  • 4 green onions, chopped
  • 1 medium carrot shredded
  • 2 cups spinach, finely shredded
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro leaves
  • Oil (to pan fry)

croquettes finishedIn a large bowl, add flour, water, lemon juice, cumin and salt. In a food processor, pulse the chick peas until they are roughly chopped (do NOT puree). Add the chickpeas from the food processor, and all other ingredients to the original large bowl, and stir well.  Batter works best if it’s refrigerated for an least half an hour, but it’s still okay to use it right away.

In a large saucepan, heat oil, over medium heat. Scoop 1/4 cup dollops of chickpea mixture into skillet. Cook until golden brown on the bottom. Flip the patties and cook 3-4 minutes more. Serve croquettes topped with the coconut sauce.

You can serve these with lots of different things, including smoothies, blended soups, baked sweet potato fries, mashed potatoes, onion rings (pictured) or whatever.   

 

Nutritional information (per croquette):

Calories 141 cals

Fat 4g

Protein 6g

Sodium 215mg

Sugar  3g

 

Mindful Mavens Giveaway: Michael’s Dolce Jams

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This giveaway is now closed. Congrats to Jess B Wright who was our winner!

 

I first met Michael at the Brewer Park farmer’s market in Ottawa. Since taste-testing a few of his hand-crafted jams, I’ve been loving them and sharing them with friends and family constantly. Seeing as he uses fresh local produce, certified organic cane sugar, and his packaging is made with either recycled or recyclable materials, his products are a great fit for the Mindful Mavens. I wanted to share Michael’s story with you and what makes his jams so special, so did a little Q&A with him. One lucky winner will get to try these as well! (See giveaway below)

How did your business start?

Michael’s Dolce started with the passion to improve the quality of jams.  I am trained in culinary arts, with several years experience working in the ‘sweet side’ (desserts) at restaurants and bakeries.

What is the story behind the name?

The name ‘Michael’s Dolce’ is derived from my name (Michael) and Dolce is an Italian word for sweet.  I choose Dolce, because the last restaurant I worked in had the dessert menu titled “Dolce”.

What sort of criteria do you have for selecting ingredients?

I look for locally grown / sourced foods.  I purchase the majority of fruit from Ontario, B.C.,and N.S.  I particularly buy from farmers at the Ottawa farmers market, Acorn creek, Warners farm, and Luxy farms.  I only use freshly squeezed lemon juice in all my jams.  In my strawberry balsamic jam, I use an 18 year old balsamic from The unrefined olive.  A new addition to my line is Smokey BBQ sauce, which is vegan and gluten free (facility is not GF).  I purchase spanish smoked paprika from Cardamom & Cloves, to support another small local business.

How do you choose flavour combinations?

Once I decide the fruit or basic ingredient, I research ways the ingredient has been used.  This leads me to a pairing flavour(s) and from there I formulate a recipe.

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Did you target your products to be specifically ethical/vegan?

Not on purpose, from the start I knew I would only make a quality product.  Selling at farmers market gave me direct connection to my costumers, understanding what people are looking for.  Striving to make ethical/vegan products make sense to the majority of my clientele, and me.

What makes them different than any other jams?

1) less sugar/no pectin

2) unique flavour combinations

3) soft set textures

Which flavor is your personal favorite and best seller?

My favorite is strawberry balsamic, the best seller is hands down Blueberry & Lavender.

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What do you do when you are not in the kitchen?

Family and friends are a key part of my spare time!  Spending valuable time eating out, keeping up with my interest in photography..to name a few.

Any exciting developments happening for the future?

This year I have started making  a vegan Sriracha sauce.

Jams in cocktails started on the drink menu at Union613.  You can find 3 of them with my jams/sriracha.

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I am collaborating with Marissa Begin (a beer rep & mixologist) to devise drinks with my jams.  She has even got ideas for which beer/drink to add my sriracha and BBQ sauce to!

I have just launched a smokey BBQ sauce which has already been well received.  Fiazza Pizza on Murray St. had approached me to make a BBQ sauce for one of their pizza’s. I was honoured to be asked, and have also been bottling them for sale too!

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So here’s what’s up for grabs:

One winner will receive four (4) 190ml jars of Michaelsdolce jams and sauces. The flavors will be:

  • Apricot Chili jam
  • Yellow Plum Anise jam
  • Sriracha sauce
  • Smokey BBQ sauce

To enter the giveaway, please respond with a comment that answers one of the following:

  • If you’ve tried Michaelsdolce jams and sauces, what’s your favourite flavour, and why?
  • If you haven’t, which flavour are you most interested to try?

Winners will be chosen randomly by number draw.

Details: Giveaway is open to Canadian residents, excluding Quebec. One random winner will win a set of 4 Michaelsdolce products. Pick-up to be arranged with Michael Sunderland. Giveaway closes on Saturday, September 13 at 11:59 PM EST.  One entry per person. The Mindful Mavens are not responsible for the delivery of the prize and cannot be held accountable for any discrepancies.

Zanadu: Comfort food in a fun environment

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I first became aware of Zanadu when a friend linked me to their Facebook page a few weeks before they opened, because they were asking if people would prefer to buy a vegan or a gluten-free grilled cheese at their cafe. Uh, duh! :D   (They were able to satisfy both requirements by procuring vegan and gluten-free bread from Strawberry Blonde Bakery.)

As they opened, I saw the word vegan hashtagged a lot, but the menu I was seeing online didn’t match the hype.   I’m always a bit leery when it seems “vegan” is being used more as a buzz word than as a description of a place’s food.  It’s not that I am not pleased when a restaurant goes to the effort; it’s more that vegan is a misunderstood word already, and it doesn’t help with the public’s understanding if it’s used inaccurately.  I decided to check it out for myself, and invited a new Maven, Kyle Den Bak, to join me.

zanadu1A warning: While Zanadu fronts Richmond Road, it isn’t immediately easy to find. However once I did find it, the first thing I was struck by was the sleek, somewhat retro interior.  It’s all black ad lime green, with disco balls and shiny dark walls. It’s spacious and airy, and trendy without being at all pretentious.  The menu is hand written on one of the glossy walls, which I couldn’t photograph properly due to the sun and the wall’s shininess. Health and fitness related magazines are on each of the tables, and a flat screen TV shows nutritional information about different kinds of fruits and veggies.

We were greeted by the owner, Barb, who comes from the hospital and fitness fields.  She’s mostly vegetarian, and is passionate about learning more about the vegan lifestyle. She told us that the menu has changed a lot even since Zanadu opened a week ago, all based on customer feedback.  (For example, people wanted more smoothie options with protein. Zanuda uses Vega, FYI).  I was impressed by her openness, and willingness to learn.

The promised vegan grilled cheese was on the wall menu, as is a grilled cheese/veggie pate hybrid sandwich, also vegan. They are not on the website yet as Barb is transitioning service providers and can’t update it.  In addition to a selection of smoothies, there are also fresh pressed juices, salads, and some pastries (all, I believe, from Strawberry Blonde.)  Small Zandu branded packages of various snacks (such as nuts) are available for convenience, as are coffee and tea.

I had the Totally Vegan grilled cheese, which has two types of the Daiya wedge cheeses, guacamole, and mango chutney. You have the option of adding a generous side of kale/chia tortilla chips with either hummus or guacamole (with finely shredded kale mixed in!) for just $2.50.   The sandwiches themselves are not inexpensive – I have lost my receipt by I believe it was about $9.25.  Sensitive to vegan concerns about cross-contamination, Barb tells me that one of the grills has been reserved exclusively for making the vegan grilled cheeses.

zanadu2The sandwich was tasty and filling, but I knew immediately what would make it even better – Mad Faux-Cheese.  I made the recommendation to Barb, and I know she’s already been in touch with Madison so stay tuned!   (I also mentioned to her that a growing number of vegans are concerned about palm oil, and that using Mad Faux-Cheese would alleviate that barrier.)

Overall Zanadu has a great space and a lot of potential to be a great hang out and place to stop for a quick lunch.  Barb is actively seeking feedback from customers so I recommend checking it out, and providing your constructive input.   It’s open daily, until 6 PM.

 
 
Zanadu
101 Richmond Road (just west of Island Park)
www.zanadu.ca
https://www.facebook.com/Zanadu.ca
@zanaduca

 

 

The things you can’t un-know

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The things you can’t un-know

I vividly remember sitting on my bed weeping, holding the book in my hand, frantically wracking my brain for an out, or a way to forget what I had just read.

What I had just read was a heart wrenching description of the experience of a mother cow, who had her baby taken away from her, in The Pig Who Sang to the Moon – The Emotional Lives of Farm Animals by Jeffrey Masson. Despite not being particularly motherly myself, something in the way it was phrased – the desperation and devastation of these cows, completely at the mercy of humans – touched my heart and mind profoundly – and permanently.

I think the worst part was the realization that all of this pain and suffering was caused for something completely needless – human consumption of cow’s milk. It struck me as tragic and unnecessary that human taste for another animals’ milk would trump the basic dignity of allowing these sensitive, sentient animals to mother their young.

It has been ten years since that passage changed my life, and it effectively made “dairy” a non-food in my mind (I was already a vegetarian at the time.) There are reminders of the horrors that humankind inflicts on animals every day, everywhere I turn. And make no mistake, the way we commodify animals is far-reaching, and the result (their lives) is nothing short of horrific.

I struggle with what I know. I think most vegans do (and anyone concerned with specific social justice issues). It devastates me.  I’m haunted.  I try to push it out of the front of my mind, but I am conscious that every moment of every day, many animals are meeting a terrible demise…all so that humans can eat and wear their bodies. Sometimes when my mind wanders I imagine it happening; I envision the fear that they must feel, the pain, the confusion… and I have to force myself to stop because it takes me to a dark place.  

For the most part, I avoid the videos and the photos that depict the reality of their putrid lives. On one hand I feel badly about it, like I’m denying them their due by not bearing witness. But on the other hand, I’ve been unequivocally vegan for a decade now, so am I really accomplishing anything aside from self-torment if I watch?  I avoid it to protect myself, so that I can be a better advocate.  Sometimes I have to throw myself into anything BUT thinking, to keep the sense of devastation at bay.

What I do do is engage in constant vegan outreach and advocacy.  It’s a survival tactic. A lot of people don’t know, and just as many don’t want to know. Some do know, and don’t know what to do with the information. Others are simply unconcerned. I tend not to put my focus on the latter.  There’s not much point. 

We live in a world that’s built on using animals for every purpose imaginable, and even armed with information and conviction, people can find it challenging to live in alignment with their beliefs. Even though sometimes I am frustrated beyond belief by the actions of humans I dig deep to find my compassion, to help them find theirs. 

An apt magnet that I bought from a recent Sit With Me fundraiser.

An apt magnet that I bought from a recent Sit With Me fundraiser.

Most people would agree that no animal should be harmed unnecessarily, but consumer choices contradict this belief. In a study conducted at Kent University in the UK, Loughnan and colleagues found that in order to escape the “meat paradox” (i.e., simultaneously enjoying eating animals and disliking hurting animals), people deny that the animals they eat suffer (Loughnan, Haslam, Bastian, 2010).   (Many thanks to Jenn L for providing this research.)

I want people to know that it’s okay to reject the meat paradox.  They can choose to align their actions with their beliefs, if they want to. 

In reading some 2004 reviews of The Pig Who Sang to the Moon to prepare this post, I noticed that Masson’s vegan message was often referred to as “radical.”  Some reviewers can barely contain their contempt. I hope that in 2014 we’ve moved away from that characterization, particularly in the face of growing scientific evidence that animals do indeed experience pain, and experience some degree of emotion.  

Even if it makes us uncomfortable.

If we want to talk about things that are radical, I can’t imagine much that’s more radical than 150-billion sentient creatures being bred and killed every year worldwide so that humans can eat them. 

You can’t unknow these things, but knowledge is power.

 

(I focus mostly on food animals in this post, but for a taste of the many ways that humans use and abuse animals, I recommend checking out Jo-Ann McArthur’s heartbreaking but poignant online gallery, We Animals.)